Lesson #282: That time I hated it, but stayed.

4/29/15.

When I walked out of my first poetry class of the semester,

I wanted to die.

My professor seemed cool and super intelligent, but she rambled.

The class seemed to have no structure, so I felt like my brain was being tossed around.

We workshopped online instead of in class, and I thought it was completely disengaging.

I was positive the class would be horrible.

But now I’m in the library, just coming back from the last class of the semester, and I can honestly say it’s one of the most meaningful classes I’ve ever been in.

It’s strange to think that on the second day, I almost dropped the class.

And it’s even more strange to think that my life—in the most inescapably cliché way— would not be the same if I had.

I have met some of the most kind, different, intelligent, and exciting people—artists, dancers, rappers, journalists—and we’ve all become closer through our writing and conversations. It saddens me to think that after this class we may all go our separate ways, but I can honestly say that my life and perspective has been impacted just from being in a room with these people for four months.

I have been put out of my comfort zone. I have learned to take chances, and put up with things I hate (aka iambs and pentameter), and have written things I would have never thought to write. I have heard many stories, and have had many, many conversations that I could never have in an everyday setting with people who are too in-their-ways or dismissive to talk about it with. I have learned how to be uncomfortable, but to explore why, and then talk through it.

I have become a little bit better of a person.

And by this, I don’t mean I—or anyone else who has come out of a good experience—was a bad person before. I just mean that every experience that you take and run with, you become a little bit more of who you are, and who you want to be.

I’m also not saying that everything we hate in the beginning will turn out to be wonderful and life-altering and perspective-shifitng.

It won’t.

But this is what I’ve found to be true.

Just because something isn’t how you first imagined it, and just because it’s not how you are used to learning, doesn’t mean it’s wrong and does’t mean you won’t benefit from it either.

Have you even given it a chance?

Try.

It could be the time of your life.

Even better—

it could lead you to a better you.

Day 282.

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